The Volta Bureau

The Volta Bureau

1880 – Alexander Graham Bell set up the Volta Laboratory Association with money from the Volta Prize. Bell set aside his share of the profits from the invention of the graphophone as an endowment fund (the Volta Fund).

1887 – The Volta Bureau is established at 3417 Volta Place, in Washington, D.C., using part of the Volta Fund and a gift from Alexander Melville Bell. The Bureau collects an extensive library of books and other materials relating to deafness.

1890 –Bell becomes the first president of the American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf (AAPTSD) in New York.

1893 – The Volta Bureau is built on the corner of Volta Place in Washington, D.C., to house the growing information center and reference library.

1899-1909 – The AAPTSD publishes The Association Review, a scientific journal for the deaf.

1908 – The AAPTSD becomes part of the Volta Bureau. The Volta Fund and the Alexander Melville Bell Memorial Fund are placed in the hands of the association.

1910 – The name of The Association Review is changed to The Volta Review, the current title of the AG Bell scientific journal to this day.

1948 – The name of the association is changed to the Volta Speech Association for the Deaf, Inc.

1956 – The name of the association is changed to the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc.

1974 – On October 18, the Volta Bureau is declared an historic landmark.

1999 – The name of the association changes to the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.